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June 27, 2008

Comments

Tolbert

I could never find a liking for the Clenet, Zimmer or Stutz.\

There is just something wrong about the proportions of the body work that keeps them from being aesthetically pleasing.

Now I'm not saying if there was something young, lithe and blond draped across the hood that I wouldn't be looking, Hell, yes I would. Otherwise, there's not enough there, there.

Professor Jonathan

I have to agree with the comment above; check out the pure lines of the real thing: the 1934 Voisin Roadster -

http://img106.imageshack.us/img106/1940/1934voisinc15roadsterbyay6.jpg

While the Europeans did have coachwork to die for, I wouldn't denigrate American equivalents such as the authentic Stutz's, Auburn Speedsters Duesenbergs and still other home-grown beauties too numerous to try to link to here.

One of these days, I'll have to do a properly instructive and boring essay about my theory of the influence of the incredible Bugatti Atlantic (1935)

http://img297.imageshack.us/img297/6837/bugattixt4.jpg

on several generations of top-notch American customizers...

http://img297.imageshack.us/img297/5841/354546887307319a8a0pp1.jpg

By the way, does anyone have a photo of the ultra-rare Douchenburge Hayseed?

I believe that only one prototype was produced somewhere in rural Iowa in the 60s. It was apparently acquired by a local resident who later became criminally insane, after which both said local resident and the Douchenburge totally disappeared from circulation...


Tolbert

Heh!

Douchenburge. I'd definitely pay to see that.

JB

"Mohs was an automobile make built by the Mohs Seaplane Corporation of Madison, Wisconsin (United States). Bruce Mohs, the company founder, built limited-production automobiles on chassis built to custom specifications by the International Harvester Company."

Hah! It's a Farmall!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohs_(automobile)

cratedigger

that last one is the PIMP.
I will be stealing that for a future project, I am sure.

dag nabbitz

If there was a Batmobile that Pimps could afford, these examples above would make the perfect Pimpmobile.

dag nabbitz

Frank Sinatra and Elvis P. must have been just a bit stoned while buying a Stutz. An original American design and Pontiac frame but- the rest was assembled in Italy!
This is a pre out-sourcing ingredient that has gradualy had a negetive effect on the good ole USA. Our auto industry can not viably compete now a days. I say this while I look at and count every single Import vs. home made cars on the highway every day. The imports have won the battle in recent grand scale.. The only positive information I need to impress is that usa auto makers stop reasting on the past(if it's not too late) and get up again to kick ass...
DODGE CHALLANGER was an awsome car and fine choice to re-introduce great car making to America. And I was poised to buy one until the dealership told me about the long wait for delivery and Challengers are only being built upon special request. Hope I am not alone in thinking this is strange biz practice.
LOL, I bought a rice burner from the dealership's parking lot as easy as 123.

leisa

All the cars were great, but I love the Excalibur Tiffany!! Although, they are not as fast as the cars of today, I'd still love to have one!

Air Intake Kits

The body, yes, it does have problems dealing with proportions but it has an elegant touch coming with it. Yeah, I would pay to see it too.

Andrina Royceston

Ah, those Neoclassical cars - they have become the prewar symbols of sophisticated men. Their aesthetic designs, especially the black and white-colored ones, are definitely eye-catching. If only they are as popular as today's hybrid cars, having them around would make expressways more colorful and interesting.

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